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Stair Runner
mosaic08 Offline
#1 Posted : Saturday, April 19, 2008 5:11:21 AM(UTC)
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What is the best method for attaching a stair runner to a wood stair?
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cloudband Offline
#2 Posted : Saturday, April 19, 2008 6:22:44 AM(UTC)
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This is a very good question. The only problem is I don't think you're going to like my response (*sorry*)

Installing a runner of any type is very much a tricky thing. Installing a hand knotted runner is even more difficult. You have to carefully plan where it will fall, and inevibly, the measuring becomes tricky because you can measure the rise and run, but you never know how much the rug stretches when you kick it. I'm not sure what your experience may be, but attaching a runner is a little more involved than most people would guess. You need some special equipment like a high velocity electric staple gun with a small crown staple. Installing a hand knotted rug is even more difficult than machine made because the pile is so much more dense.

My suggestion would be to hire someone to do it. It can get very tricky to do, especially for the first time. It's not as easy as it seems to do a solid install.
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KrowGyrl Offline
#3 Posted : Saturday, April 19, 2008 6:58:23 AM(UTC)
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Installing a runner of any type is very much a tricky thing. Installing a hand knotted runner is even more difficult. >>>

This is interesting. In all honesty, it never crossed my mind in a million years that someone would install a handknotted runner on a staircase. That pretty much signals the end of the line for that carpet, I would think. I guess that's the point. You're planning on staying put. It would seem this is why the tribal carpets are (am I correct) always the lighter weight pieces, for easy transport? I am reminded of the European medieval court tapestries that were fabulous works but also designed to be moved from summer court to winter court and different palaces and served the dual purpose of beauty and "branded" motifs for the individual family and court, and also to keep out the notorious drafts in stone fortresses.
mosaic08 Offline
#4 Posted : Saturday, April 19, 2008 7:07:39 AM(UTC)
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...interesting... i am assuming a rug of this length was intended for a stair and it should fit quite nicely, but should i be concerned about putting down a hand-knotted rug? also, i was afraid you were going to say that about the installation... i was trying to take into consideration the fact that the rug was longer then the simple rise/run... we'll see...i do have a pretty handy father-in-law, however, this is going in a critical area where not having it installed could really hurt someone.... i'll have to think about it some more... thanks for your responses...
RugPro Offline
#5 Posted : Saturday, April 19, 2008 8:20:17 AM(UTC)
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It may fit nicely, but hand knotted rugs really shouldn't be installed on stairs unless you must have it done. If you plan on using it on the stairs, I wouldn't expect it to have much of a life after that. usually rugs that have been installed on stairs, while they may be removed, show some sort of worn areas which would look a little silly if it were laid out flat.

Usually a rug of this length is just for long hallways. The thing about a hand knotted rug other than being difficult to install, is not only can you measure the rise and run, and think you have it measured out perfect... but you still never know how the rug will land once you get to the bottom of the steps or the top, depending on how you want to have it finish. It could end up looking a little funny. The nice thing about machine made carpets is you can cut it and have it land exactly where you want. I'm not sure how particular you guys are, but it's a little awkward when the runner starts a couple feet before the stairs, or doesn't quite make it down to the last one.

You can try it though, but just be sure you take your time with it. It absolutely has been done many times before, but these Kerman rugs are really thick pieces to be fixing to stairs.

Congrats on the baby by the way that's very, very exciting!
RugPro Offline
#6 Posted : Monday, April 21, 2008 6:51:14 AM(UTC)
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mosaic08 wrote:
i do have a pretty handy father-in-law, however, this is going in a critical area where not having it installed could really hurt someone.... i'll have to think about it some more... thanks for your responses...


I am in the midst of doing a write up on this with help from a very well experienced installer we work with. Do note that there will be varying applications, in which you have to determine what would be good. To further help you in your decision making, if you have someone that is handy to do the work, by all means give it a shot. We like to stay on the side of caution, and try just one step. If the rug is not stable (and I mean it has to be on the stair very, very well) don't continue. I can give you some tips, but PROCEED AT YOUR OWN RISK. I won't take responsibility for tack holes in your stairs, poor installation or other.

I wish you the best of luck, and would recommend a couple of things. Most importantly, you're going to want a very strong electric staple gun which can be rented at a local home depot, and you want to make sure the installation is done very tight. You'll want to rent a carpet kicker to help keep pressure on the rug although it's not necessary, it does help to prevent tiring. However, using the kicker can really only be implemented if you are installing bottom to top. You also need some padding which will get cut for each step.

Machine made rugs are usually installed from the bottom step up. You can do the same for a hand knotted rug, but you may have a different area you want it to land. Like I said before, the landing area can be determined just by cutting the machine made rug. For a hand knotted carpet, you have to plan carefully where you want it to land, and decide accordingly where you will want to start the rug. You can always tuck the fringe behind the runner need be.

You will have to secure the rug very, very, well. You have to use a bunch of tacs - somewhere in the vicinity of 2 dozen under the lip, and 2 dozen into the corner where the step meets the rise. You may find some stair rods help to keep the rug in place, and you'll need it especially for this thicker type of Kerman rug. You can rent duo-fast staple guns at Home Depot, the box of staples you'll need 5418-D the staples are 9/16ths long and the crown is 3/16ths. They're the flat crowns without a peak. As for the types of To be sure the evidence of installation is not seen, you want to tack underneath the lip of the stair, and be sure to bury the stapler into the pile shifting the wool to the side so you staple the base of the rug as well as possible. If there are moldings, you can go directly into this, or below the molding into the top of the riser. Try it out on one step, see if it works. Tug at the rug, and if you see it releases quick, that's no good. Make sure it's in there, and if it doesn't work on the first step, don't continue. Installation of a stair runner relies heavily on a solid job with careful craftsmanship. If it is not done right, the whole process can really be a dangerous.

If you are planning to do this, do know the runner will probably not be very presentable after it has been used on the stairs.

Jacobsen's site is good for the install tips, but note that a regular staple gun will not be sufficient, and tackless strips are not needed for install - this is usually for wall to wall on stairs. You can follow these instructions for the most part including the part on the direction of the pile and the padding on each step to be used which can get tacked down as well. Another great site for the install is this one here.
Nathan K. Offline
#7 Posted : Saturday, March 21, 2009 4:55:51 PM(UTC)
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Harry Myers Offline
#8 Posted : Sunday, March 22, 2009 5:40:53 PM(UTC)
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I install runners mainly as well as Fabricate rugs. I have also installed oriental runners on stairs for clients that must have. A site for a certifed floor covering installer http://www.cfi-installer...tallers/installers.html . As well as Nathan pointed Zoroufy stair rods are very pleasingto the eye. I am also a Zoroufy dealer.
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#9 Posted : Tuesday, March 24, 2009 11:55:06 AM(UTC)
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Nathan K. wrote:


Wow! I would never put anything on those stairs......but having said that, that is the most gorgeous stair runner I have ever seen.
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